Free

Safe Haven: DIAS and the WWII immigrants who helped shape it

Actions and Detail Panel

Free

Event Information

Share this event

Date and time

Location

Location

Online event

Event description
As part the Dublin Festival of History, the Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies presents a talk on some of its notable first researchers.

About this event

Immigrants and refugees coming to Ireland are not – or not only – a recent phenomenon, though very often there is no awareness who came and had an impact before the 21st century. This talk will focus on German-speaking refugees who came to Ireland to escape Hitler and specifically the academics among them. Several of them helped to shape the Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies. What were their backgrounds, how did they come to Dublin and what did they contribute? Building on research that led to the publication of An Irish Sanctuary: German-speaking refugees in Ireland 1933-1945 (Berlin/Boston: de Gruyter 2017, paperback 2018) these questions will be answered and contextualised.

Share with friends

Date and time

Location

Online event

{ _('Organizer Image')}

Organiser Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies

Organiser of Safe Haven: DIAS and the WWII immigrants who helped shape it

The Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies (DIAS) conducts advanced studies exploring big questions of the 21st century and beyond. Its research gains insights into Celtic society and its legacy; progresses our understanding of our island, our planet and the universe; and deciphers the underpinning mathematical principles of nature.

The Institute leads Ireland’s participation in a number of international and global initiatives that focus on big unanswered questions for mankind.

When it was founded in 1940, DIAS was the world’s second-only institute for advanced studies – and the first such institute in Europe. For 80 years, it has pushed the boundaries of discovery and, today, it is a globally-embedded institution that attracts high-calibre researchers from all over the world in its core disciplines of Celtic Studies, Theoretical Physics, Astrophysics and Geophysics. DIAS Dunsink Observatory is a designated European site of historical significance for physics.

Save This Event

Event Saved