Free

Women and the Irish Revolution 1917-23: Violence, Feminism, Nationalism

Event Information

Share this event

Date and Time

Location

Location

The Royal Irish Academy

29 Dawson Street

Dublin 2

Ireland

View Map

Friends Who Are Going
Event description

Description

Women and the Irish Revolution 1917-23: Feminism, Violence, Nationalism
Venue: the Royal Irish Academy, Dawson Street, Dublin 2

Date: September 1st 2017

Organiser: Professor Linda Connolly, Maynooth University

The period 1917–1923 was marked by political violence and upheaval in Ireland, ending in partition and independence for 26 of its 32 counties. How this period of revolution significantly affected women's lives requires further analysis in Irish studies. This conference will bring together new research by leading scholars exploring how women both participated in revolutionary activities in the 1917-23 period in Ireland and were impacted by the climate of terror and war that existed. Irish historiography that presents the narrative of this period as predominantly about men and male militarism, with women presumed to have escaped the worst brutalities of war, will be challenged. The complex experience of Irish women throughout this period as activists, militants, and as ordinary citizens is explored using new evidence.

By adopting an integrated approach to Irish women’s history between 1917-1923, a new indepth analysis of women’s role in 'the Revolution' will be provided. In particular, new light will be shed on the intersection of feminism, republicanism, class and the impact of violence against women in the period. The experience of women needs to be adequately considered as a core dynamic of war both in new critical historical tomes of the period and in the programme of key events to be commemorated in Ireland in the next years. As the extensive analysis of women's role and experience in civil wars internationally has shown, the gendered nature of war and conflict is not a separate or ancillary question in any context. Nor are women simply mere victims or bystanders of conflicts effectively steered by male political leaders or militants. The granting of suffrage in 1918, the complex but often occluded role of women as activists in the Revolution, the role of women in the foundation of the new State, and the wider impact of conflict, trauma and violence on women during the Civil War and War of Independence are core questions in Irish revolutionary studies that require further indepth analysis and consideration, if this critical period of Irish history is to be fully understood.

Speakers/Papers:

Suffragism and Nationalism – contesting ‘Traditional Womanhood’,
Professor Louise Ryan, University of Sheffield

Women TDs and the Irish Treaty Debates,
Claire McGing, Maynooth University

The Unimagined Community: Feminists and Revolutionaries in Holloway Prison, 1918 – 1919,
Professor Lucy McDiarmid, Montclair State University

Women of the Poorer Class during the Revolution,
Dr. Brian Hanley

‘A chip on my shoulder’: Belfast Cumann na mBan in the aftermath of the Easter Rising,
Dr. Margaret Ward, Queen’s University, Belfast

Sister Against Sister: Cumann na mBan during the Irish Civil War,
Dr. John Borgonovo, UCC

The Women Killed during the Irish Revolution,
Dr. Andy Bielenberg, UCC

Women, Violence and the Irish Revolution 1917-23: Sexual Violence and Hair Shorning,
Professor Linda Connolly, Maynooth University

'Home Safe Home?': War, violence and the disruption of female, domestic and familial spaces during the War of Independence, 1919-1921,
Dr. Mary McAuliffe, UCD

Remembering revolutionary martyrs and concealing dead children at the Tuam Mother and Baby Home
Dr. Sarah-Anne Buckley, NUIG and Dr. John Cunningham, NUIG

Traumatic Memory and Female Bereavement in Literary depictions of the Irish Revolution,
Dr. Ailbhe McDaid, University of Liverpool

Poetry reading:

Doireann Ní Ghríofa (in collaboration with the Department of English, Maynooth University)


This event is funded by an Irish Research Council, New Foundations (Decade of Commemorations strand) Grant


loveirishresearch_cle02a4bd.jpg


K7384-Maynooth-University-Logo_RGB_300dpi.jpg


Image above: Huge crowds at Westland Row station in Dublin as Markievicz, MacNeill, De Valera & other prisoners arrive home in 1917


Share with friends

Date and Time

Location

The Royal Irish Academy

29 Dawson Street

Dublin 2

Ireland

View Map

Save This Event

Event Saved